Reload

Blog

what's new

Drop us a line...

Drop us a line
What's New

Our Blog

Watch what you feed your pets at Thanksgiving

  • 22 November 2017
  • Author: Miranda
  • Number of views: 766
  • Comments
Watch what you feed your pets at Thanksgiving

As families prepare for their Thanksgiving celebrations this week, they may not be thinking of their pet and what could be potentially harmful to them.

While sharing scraps from your Thanksgiving meal may be a treat for your pet, it may also be doing more harm than good.

Farmington Animal Hospital Veterinarian Jamie Johnson said the "big don’t" this holiday season is fatty foods.

“I know people like to give their pets turkey skin, but that is high in fat and we don’t want to give them bone because we worry about them choking on them and potentially getting stuck on the way out,” said Johnson. “Basically think about your fatty foods and chocolate of course is a no-no.”

Johnson said grapes and raisins also pose a danger to pet’s health. She stressed that high fatty foods can potentially pose GI (Gastro-Intestinal) problems, such as vomiting, diarrhea and pancreatitis.

“I usually recommend pet owners don’t feed their pets anything, but if you are going to, maybe just a little bit of roll or a small piece of turkey without the skin on it is OK for most dogs,” said Johnson. “I just usually recommend that they don’t feed their pets human foods anyway.”

Johnson said do not feed any pet raw dough with yeast because it can rise in their stomach, which can be pretty dangerous too.

“If there is any in the trash and they get ahold of it, that could be bad and it would bloat them up, but baked bread is OK as long as it is small amounts,” said Johnson. “Onion and garlic is also bad and is extremely toxic to your pets. Since these items are included in most stuffing recipes, you should avoid giving this in any amount to your pets.”

Johnson added she wouldn’t give dogs any nuts either, especially macadamia nuts. It’s also recommended to be careful with cats and puppies and make sure decorations aren’t hanging too low. Decorations could possibly damage their intestinal tract if pets get into something they shouldn’t and they'd likely have to have surgery.

As families prepare for their Thanksgiving celebrations this week, they may not be thinking of their pet and what could be potentially harmful to them. While sharing scraps from your Thanksgiving meal may be a treat for your pet, it may also be doing more harm than good.

Farmington Animal Hospital Veterinarian Jamie Johnson said the "big don’t" this holiday season is fatty foods.

“I know people like to give their pets turkey skin, but that is high in fat and we don’t want to give them bone because we worry about them choking on them and potentially getting stuck on the way out,” said Johnson. “Basically think about your fatty foods and chocolate of course is a no-no.”

Johnson said grapes and raisins also pose a danger to pet’s health. She stressed that high fatty foods can potentially pose GI (Gastro-Intestinal) problems, such as vomiting, diarrhea and pancreatitis.

“I usually recommend pet owners don’t feed their pets anything, but if you are going to, maybe just a little bit of roll or a small piece of turkey without the skin on it is OK for most dogs,” said Johnson. “I just usually recommend that they don’t feed their pets human foods anyway.”

Johnson said do not feed any pet raw dough with yeast because it can rise in their stomach, which can be pretty dangerous too.

“If there is any in the trash and they get ahold of it, that could be bad and it would bloat them up, but baked bread is OK as long as it is small amounts,” said Johnson. “Onion and garlic is also bad and is extremely toxic to your pets. Since these items are included in most stuffing recipes, you should avoid giving this in any amount to your pets.”

Johnson added she wouldn’t give dogs any nuts either, especially macadamia nuts. It’s also recommended to be careful with cats and puppies and make sure decorations aren’t hanging too low. Decorations could possibly damage their intestinal tract if pets get into something they shouldn’t and they'd likely have to have surgery.

Photo source: Renee Bronaugh/DailyJournalOnline

source: Daily Journal Online


Print
Categories: Pet Blog 2
Tags:
Rate this article:
No rating

Websites

When deciding on a website, choosing between a template and a custom design can be difficult. Let 3 Sided Media help!

Social Media

Social media is one of the ways clients discover goods and services in the web-driven market today.

Customer Service

Our work for you begins where other website companies end. Once your website is completed, our team just getting started.